28 publishers race for seventh-grade textbook deal


Business

28 publishers race for seventh-grade textbook deal


Julius Jwan, director of the Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development, distributes textbooks to students at MM Shah Primary School in Kisumu on January 19. FILE PHOTO | NMG

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Summary

  • Some of these companies include the government agency Kenya Literature Bureau (KLB), Oxford, Longhorn, Mountain Top, Moran, Spotlight and East African Educational Publishers.
  • The state provides textbooks directly to schools with the goal of achieving a 1:1 textbook-to-student ratio to improve learning.
  • In the last cycle, 32 companies submitted submissions to the KICD, eight of which were selected to provide sixth-grade coursebooks.

The Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development (KICD) received requests from 28 companies to provide Grade 7 textbooks under the competency-based curriculum.

Winning companies will be required to publish 19 textbooks which the government will provide to schools in preparation for the rollout of the new curriculum to grade 7 in January.

Some of these companies include the government agency Kenya Literature Bureau (KLB), Oxford, Longhorn, Mountain Top, Moran, Spotlight and East African Educational Publishers.

“A total of 28 publishers have submitted course materials to the Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development (KICD) for assessment and are awaiting approval on April 14,” said Lawrence Njagi, President of the Kenya Publishers Association (KPA). .

The state provides textbooks directly to schools with the goal of achieving a 1:1 textbook-to-student ratio to improve learning.

In the last cycle, 32 companies submitted submissions to the KICD, eight of which were selected to provide sixth-grade coursebooks.

Submitted course materials are evaluated against curriculum design to ensure publishers align content with what teachers are expected to teach.

Publishers are required to incorporate relevant and contemporary issues and service-learning community learning as provided as part of the basic education curriculum.

Mr Njagi said publishers have also submitted submissions for complementary materials, including dictionaries, atlases and storybooks, with approvals expected in May.

After business selection, education experts and KICD editors converge to fine-tune the approved books before printing.

The direct supply of textbooks to schools aims to get rid of cartels in the distribution chain that had been accused of inflating textbook prices.

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